gallery/myler4d

Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

 

Established 1987

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Click on photos to see movies, please be patient.

Our Mission
The creators of Myler bits - Ron, Dale and Bob Myler with Brad Kays joining our team in the early 1990's to become  our leading craftsman -  offer a philosophy behind each of their bits. The bits are designed to establish communication between the rider’s hands and the horse with the least amount of resistance. The bit is a communication TOOL.  To effectively communicate with your horse, your horse must be RELAXED.  If your horse is resistant, your horse is not effectively receiving your message. The key to properly bitting any horse is to find the mouthpiece the horse can relax into, with the hands that are holding it.

Last Revised: 08/26/2018
Copyright © 1999-2016 /William Russell. All rights reserved.










 

gallery/myler4d

Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

gallery/mylernew2

Samples of Myler Silver bits.

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#1

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#6

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#11

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#16

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#21

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#26

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#2

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#7

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#12

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#17

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#22

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#27

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#3

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#8

#13

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#18

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#23

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#28

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#4

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#9

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#14

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#19

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#24

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#29

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#5

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#10

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#15

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#20

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#25

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#30

Home

Home

Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

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Our suggestion for the equine professional! Spurs by Ron Myler    

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#26

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#27

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#28

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#29

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#30

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#31

 
 

gallery/myler4d

Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

gallery/mylernew2

BITS MENU

The creators of Myler Bits, Ron, Dale and Bob Myler, offer a philosophy behind each of their bits.
The bit is a communication tool, and to effectively communicate with your horse, he must be relaxed.
If your horse is resistant, he is not effectively receiving your message and needs a different bit which lets him relax.

  The Mylers have designed an entire bitting system to effectively communicate with any horse at any level of training.
Based on bitting a horse appropriately through his training, the system works by releasing points of pressure and using softer bits as the horse progresses.

Website is under construction - please scroll down to see all mouthpieces -- Thank you!

Click on images to enlarge.

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32-3
Front and Top View

32
Front and Top View

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gallery/images-barrel_bits-36_Front_and_Top

32-R
Front and Top View

36
Front and Top View

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gallery/images-barrel_bits-LP43_R_Front_and_Top

LP43
Front and Top View

LP43-R
Front and Top View

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HP43
Front and Top View

HP43-R
Front and Top View

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32HP
Front and Top View

33-R
Front and Top View

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gallery/others-33HP

43-MP
Front and Top View

33-HP
Front and Top View

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#33 Front and Top

For more information on ordering, call us toll-free at 1-800-354-3613.

Myler's Regular Snaffle Line Single and Double Jointed

Click on images to enlarge.

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09
    Front and Top View

09FC
Front and Top View

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10
Front and Top View

#11
Loose Ring with Copper
Front and Top View

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#11
Loose Ring
Front and Top View


#11
Bristol with Roller

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#39
Front and Top View


For more information on ordering, call us toll-free at 1-800-354-3613.




Comfort Snaffle Line

Click on images to enlarge.

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#01
Front and Top View

#02
Front and Top View

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#04
Front and Top View


#05
Front and Top View

For more information on ordering, call us toll-free at 1-800-354-3613.


Myler's Hinge Line

Click on images to enlarge.

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                 #30
Front and Top View

#31
Front and Top View

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#42
Front and Top View

#40
Front and Top View

For more information on ordering, call us toll-free at 1-800-354-3613.

Return to MENU



















Myler's Correctional Barrel Mouthpieces

 

Click on images to enlarge.

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gallery/images-correctional-27_PB_R_T_HP_Front_and_Top

27PB-LP
Front and Top Views

27PB-R-T-HP
Front and Top Views

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41PB
Front and Top Views

47PB-LP
Front and Top VIews

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27PB-HP
Front and Top Views

47PB-HP
Front and Top Views

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gallery/images-correctional-47PB_R_HP_Front_and_Top

27PB-R-HP
Front and Top Views

47PB-R-HP
Front and Top Views

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#27PB-MP-W
Front and Top Views

41PB-WIDE
Front and Top VIews

Myler's Correctional Mouthpieces

Click on images to enlarge.

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27LP
Front and Top Views

27HP
Front and Top Views

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gallery/images-correctional_mouth-47LP_Front_and_Top

27-R
Front and Top Views

47LP
Front and Top Views

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41
Front and Top Views

41R
Front and Top Views

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28
Front and Top Views

29
Front and Top Views

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49
Front and Top Views

47HP
Front and Top Views

Myler's Solid Mouthpieces

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Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

gallery/mylernew2


Welcome to
Myler Bits

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Combination Bit

The adjustments and versatility of this bit from starting colts to performance to trail riding.
We cannot emphasize enough the proper adjustment AND introduction to this bit to get the maximum out of it.

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Putting the bit on the horse

Lengthen headstall out so you can easily get it over the ears. Lengthen curb strap or unhook it when putting it on the first time.

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1

With curb strap loose or unhooked, adjust headstall first

We suggest pulling the mouthpiece up to one wrinkle; that will put the mouthpiece all the way to the bottom of the big ring. These bits have a higher purchase, so some headstalls will not adjust this high so you NEED to have one that will. Once you get this done, adjust your curb and noseband so you can just barely get your little finger under the noseband or, in #2, one finger under the curb strap. Number 1 shows where the noseband should be.

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2

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3

Because the noseband is made of parachute cord and rawhide for flexibility it can drop too low, so we suggest tying a string or cord from the noseband to the browband or headstall crown. Tie the noseband so it cannot drop down on the soft spot of the nose and cut off the horse’s air. You want it just above the soft spot, but not too high. With this adjustment you will be working mostly off nose pressure, letting your horse get used to carrying a bit without too much pressure in the mouth.

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4

Taking a combination off:

Because of the adjustment of this bit it is VERY important to lower the headstall three or four holes on one side when taking it off or putting it on. This will allow you to get over the ears more easily. After putting it on, you can re-adjust the headstall.

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5

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6

This combination gives three rein placement options to give three different degrees of leverage

#6: Rein position one – pulling straight back with both reins with light contact. The arrow points to a “stop” on the big ring which allows the mouthpiece to slide only so far. With the reins in this position the mouthpiece slides about a half inch before noseband pressure is felt. Your horse gets a chance to carry the bit with very little pressure in the mouth, working mainly off the nose.

Picture #7 is the second placement option showing the rein position with light contact

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7

Going to the bit:

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Lower the mouthpiece, down from the one wrinkle we had, so that it’s just touching the corners of the mouth. Lowering the bit will also automatically loosen the curb. This is shown in picture 9. With this adjustment – pulling back with light contact – the mouthpiece will slide to the “stop” on the ring but since we lowered the headstall, we’ll still get only about one wrinkle and no real gag action. This will allow us to go more to the bit before the pressure on the nose.

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9

This is a different cheek piece which also has three rein positions. In this picture the reins are in the second position. The arrows indicate positions one and three.

Introducing the combination bit, or any new bit, from the ground

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10

Demonstrates getting the horse soft vertically and understanding how to release pressure when he softens.

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11

Demonstrates working to soften the horse laterally, allowing the horse to feel how this is working and learn to release the pressure. This exercise should be done from both sides

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12

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13

Demonstrates how we also work these same exercises from the saddle before riding.

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14

Demonstrates the combination with a tie-down and how it is added to the system.

Our combination is made with a rawhide noseband and leather curb. Other options are: softening the noseband with several things, including vet wrap (#3). The combination can be ordered with a one inch wide leather noseband (#9). Curb straps change the authority of the bit. Leather is softest (#2) followed by flat chain (#9) and twisted chain (not shown).

Our handmade combination line offers a number of cheekpieces:

Illustrations:

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Learn more about combination bits here

gallery/myler4d

Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

gallery/mylernew2

Welcome to
Myler Bits

  About Combination Bits ...

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Utilizing various pressure points, Combination Bits offer simultaneous interaction of the mouthpiece, curb strap and noseband. When rein pressure is applied or released, the bit automatically disperses or releases pressure to the

horse's mouth, chin,

poll. Because pressure is dispersed, the bits offer succint and effective, yet very humane communication, allowing the

nose and

rider to use less pressure than needed with a traditional bit. Rewarding the horse for staying light, the sliding mouthpiece offers encouraging "free play" before completely engaging, making the Combination Bit an

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excellent training tool.

Parts of the Combination Bit ...

1. The headstall is attached to the purchase. With rein pressure, the purchase tilts forward, applying downward pressure on the poll.

2. The curb strap sits high on the jaw, so to be closer to the rotational point of the second vertebrae or poll. Curb pressure encourages the horse to rotate his nose downward and backward until the pressure is released, hence he relaxes at the poll.

3. The noseband applies downward and backward pressure over points on the nose. In response to the pressure, the horse will drop his nose down and back towards his center. Rawhide noseband.

4. The sliding mouthpiece works lightly in the mouth, applying subtle pressure on the tongue and/or bars, until it hits the "ring stop" when it then applies downward pressure, asking the horse with more of a signal.

5. The rein attachment is on the lower ring. If one chooses to have the option of direct action, a second rein can be used on the center ring, like a Pelham.

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How Combination Bits Work ...
Dispersed pressure for a kinder, softer message - Utilizing various pressure points, Combination Bits offer simultaneous interaction of the mouthpiece, curb strap and noseband. When rein pressure is applied or released, the bit automatically disperses or releases pressure to the horse's mouth, chin, nose and poll. Because pressure is dispersed between all four areas, the bits offer succinct and effective, yet very humane communication, allowing the rider to use less pressure than needed with a traditional bit. Subtle pressure is applied to the mouth as the mouthpiece slides on the ring. Rewarding the horse for staying light, the sliding mouthpiece offers encouraging "free play" before completely engaging and applying downward pressure. Together with the downward pressure of the noseband and the forward pressure on the curb strap, the Combination Bit is very effective at asking a horse to relax at the poll.

Applications for Training and Correction ...
Combination Bits are available with all levels of mouthpieces from Comfort Snaffles to Ported Barrels to work with a variety of horses. Because all the pressure areas engage and release at the same time, the horse is offered a pressure-free reward whenever he is light and relaxed at the poll. This makes the Combination Bit an excellent training tool, for horses ranging from youngsters to well-schooled campaigners.

Suitable for numerous disciplines, Combination Bits can even be used in some competitions, including Western timed events, showjumping and cross country jumping.

As with any bit, it is important to be mindful of resistance to the Combination Bit. As your horse progresses through his training, he will ask for less pressure by resisting. With resistance, go to a softer bit with less pressure. The Combination Bit can be used consistently through a phase of a horse's training or intermittently to correct certain issues as they arise.

gallery/myler4d

Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

gallery/mylernew2

We suggest you choose "SAVE" and download articles so you can share them.   

gallery/myler4d

Myler Bits,

"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

gallery/mylernew2
gallery/myler4d

Myler Bits,
"Designed with the Equine in mind."
  featuring our patented bushing system!

gallery/mylernew2

Our Mission
The creators of Myler bits - Ron, Dale and Bob Myler with Brad Kays joining our team in the early 1990's to become  our leading craftsman -  offer a philosophy behind each of their bits. The bits are designed to establish communication between the rider’s hands and the horse with the least amount of resistance. The bit is a communication TOOL.  To effectively communicate with your horse, your horse must be RELAXED.  If your horse is resistant, your horse is not effectively receiving your message. The key to properly bitting any horse is to find the mouthpiece the horse can relax into, with the hands that are holding it.

Myler bits cover a wide range of bitting needs, from start to finish, for Western, English and Driving disciplines.  Sizes include minis, light horses, mules and draft horses.

Contact us

Ron, Dale, Bob and Brad

Phone: 1-417-859-0177

Toll Free: 1-800-354-3613

 

Postal address:
2043 Good Hope Road, Marshfield, MO 65706

Information, Support and Sales:

Bob Myler:  mylerbitsusa@mylerbitsusa.com

Myler Bits - Bitting Questionnaire

Filling out our bitting questionnaire will give us a better understanding of your horse's problem(s) and will help us give you the best possible recommendation.

Myler Bit questionaire

Questions marked by * are required.

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Name: *

Email: *

1. How many times a week do you ride your horse?

Do you ride English or Western?

Where do you live?

How old is your horse?

What is the breed of your horse?

The last time your horses teeth were checked by a Vet. or equine dentist ?

Do you show or ride for pleasure?

What bits have you used on your horse?

Which bit encouraged the best response from your horse?

Which bit resulted in the least favorable response?

Describe your horses temperament ?

What changes would you like to see in your horse?

Describe your level/years experience.

Comments

Dale Myler Seminar and Clinic Schedule

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“All learning starts in the same place: the mind. Get the mind relaxed and focused, and the rest will follow.” – Dale Myler

Dale Myler and his brothers Ron and Bob are third generation horsemen, and are three of the world’s leading bit designers. Dale’s extensive research into equine dentistry and physiology has evolved our understanding of not only the mechanics of bits but also how they can contribute to the communication between horse and rider. Their unique designs focus on mentally relaxing horses so the rider can achieve more effective communication.
Known for his kind and thoughtful approach, Dale is motivated by a genuine desire to improve the relationship between horse and rider. He has done bitting clinics and seminars all over the US and around the world: Australia, New Zealand, Sweden, Wales, England, Germany, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, Poland, Switzerland and Austria. He speaks at expos and for many organizations, as well as conducts private clinics and seminars.

 

 

Please wait, movie will appear and start in a few minutes.

You may meet Dale Myler if you attend a bitting clinic on solving bitting problems.
Dale has become well known for his expertise for solving control problems.

To speak with Bob, Dale or Ron Myler,
Mylers USA Office 1-800-354-3613

Send inquiries to: Myler Bit Company

Last Revised:01/02/2012
Copyright © 1999-2012 /William Russell. All rights reserved.

Please be Patient, movie will load and start momentarily.

You may see Ron at a cutting, The Reno Rodeo or the National Finals Rodeo,
or talk with him at the shop.



To speak with Bob, Dale or Ron Myler,
Mylers USA Office 1-800-354-3613

Send inquiries to: Myler Bit Company

Last Revised:06/02/12
Copyright © 1999-2015 /William Russell. All rights reserved.

Bob Myler riding demonstration.


 

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Bits
by John O'Leary

There is an extreme problem with Bits and their adverse effect upon Horses in Dressage and of course these are the type of things that I notice a lot. Especially with the use of the double Bridle. Lot's of Horses scream out for relief from them, no doubt due to many things, including teeth not done but also for Veterinary reasons and particularly Mouth conformation.

THE FEI
There is no doubt in my mind that the F.E.I. have it dead wrong when it comes to the rules

surrounding the use of Double Bridles, made up by the "Bradoon' and the "Weymouth" Without me researching the subject, just the sound of these terms conjure up images of

Generals on Horse back in the Bore War and he Bits are a carryover from at least that era

and most probably before.

I know for a fact, that such Bits cannot fit all Horses and lot's of Horses simply cannot be fitted

at all. Hence the reason why so many poor souls are exhibiting unsettled Mouths at the

Dressage and of course with the resultant lower scores from the Judges. Not the fault of the Rider, the Horse or the Training, simply the Bit. Not to mention of course the torment those

that we are supposed to love and nurture the most, the Horse.

The FEI Bit Rules belong in the dark ages imho and I have enough evidence to back this up. You know that Horses never lie and many a Horse tells me that they simply cannot stand

such Bits and are simply not physically equipped to even be able to carry them. The level of stress that I see in Horses and the resultant resistance, hollowing and evasion is immense.

Who's looking after the Horses?
You may know that Mrs. HP and I are sponsored by Myler and I note that they have just attempted to make the lives of F.E.I. Horses a little better and a Bit has been approved that

will actually swivel in the Mouth of the Horse, BUT there is much more work to be done imho and I have been conducting studies and experiments to put a case to the Myler Brothers, to

make a real difference to the Poor Horses. Incidentally, I am told that optional snaffle F.E.I. Classes a not being conducted in EU. Where are they here? The well trained Horse should be able to do any of the movements, in a snaffle.

These Bits come from the era of the "Big Fat Bits" Big Fat everything. I call them 'Gob

Stoppers" or "All day Suckers" that we used to buy at School. There is no room in the Mouths of Horses for them and therefore, they are cruel. The Ethics Scientists should concentrate on such issues rather than "Rein Gauges" for that would be a most admirable pursuit of their time.

Quote taken from the Net.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with "bridoon", and need a little more information on it. Here it is:

A bridoon is a snaffle bit which has small rings, and is used in conjunction with a Weymouth (curb) bit or a pelham bit in a double bridle.

The U.S calvary used a "bridoon" bridle and was standard issue before 1812, although it was common for some to use just a single bit. The 1841 bridoon bridles have a separate strap or

"holder" for fastening the "snaffle' to, which give the appearance that the bridle has 2 throat straps. This style changed in the early 1900s, so the 1841 is a rare find. During the U.S. civil war very few used a bridoon bridle, a snaffle was most often the bit of choice.
bridoon - Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 :

Bridoon \Bri*doon"\, n. [F. bridon, from bride; of German
origin. See Bridle, n.] (Mil.)
The snaffle and rein of a military bridle, which acts

independently of the bit, at the pleasure of the rider. It is

used in connection with a curb bit, which has its own rein.
--Campbell.
June 21st, 2009

F.E.I. & BITS
More time tonight so I can be more rational :) Let's examine this subject further:
Not all mouths of Horses are shaped the same, therefore......
* The same Bit cannot fit or suit every Horse.
If those points are accepted as fact, then the following must also be:
* That those Horses with Mouths that happen to be formed to handle such Bits have an unfair advantage over the others.
* Those that have Mouths that cannot handle the size, thickness or shape are unfairly penalized
* It is completely unfair on those that cannot. Both Horses and Riders'. It is also arguably cruel to those Horses that don't fit the Bits.
* Therefore the playing field in the Sport of high level Dressage is not level and so, unfair and

ill designed. It cannot give a true result.

But it is the need for such a Mouth full of metal that I must admit I am against.

There are two Bits put into the Mouth of a Horse for from the middle levels of Dressage to the top level. A snaffle (bridoon) and a Curb Bit (weymouth) Why do people need two? If the Judges see the bottom rein tight, they penalize the Rider. If they even see the shank of the

Curb being pulled back at all, whereby is appears to e heading parallel to the ground, the

Rider is penalized. So what gives with the fact that the double Bridle is optional at the 4th level (medium) and compulsory in Advanced. The 5th Level. Incidentally, these are the further levels. Advanced, Prix St. Georges, Intermediate One, Intermediate Two and Grand Prix (Olympic Level)

So do you agree it is all a farce???? I think it is. It is just a matter of the Law being an Ass and the Horse Industry being stuck in the dark ages and not lifting out of it. Pony Club, Dressage and others, all stuck in the Military Times with Military Rules. If Horsemen were so rigid, we would still be choking them down and bucking them out.

Then there is the cruelty. I recently investigated the case of a F.E.I. Horse that was at Intermediate 2 Level. The Horse was being difficult to bridle which is why it came to me. Upon investigation....."Listening to the Horse" in other words, I found that it had been choking......for two years yet :( The tongue was being trapped behind the big thick Bit and was trying to bulge over the top of the Bit as it couldn't fit below.

So how many of you are Riding Horses at Medium Level or above and find that your Horse

often lifts it's head 'above the Bit" momentarily???? There are plenty of you because I see

you at the Dressage. Your Horses are having a gulp of air every now and again. How does

that make you all feel????

So for just those reasons (but there are more) the matter of Bits has to be looked at urgently. The Horses are relying upon you all.

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